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Acer rufinerve

Identity

Common name: Red veined maple
Synonyms: Acer pensylvanicum ssp. rufinerve, A. cucullobracteatum
Origin: Japan
Plant type: Tree
Life cycle: Perennial
Code of conduct: Annex II
Invasive status (ISEIA protocol): Watch list
Main ornemental function: Ornamental tree

Description

Tree up to 15-20 m tall. Very green appearance (young stems are green). Snake barkmarple (bark with distinctive white-striped). Leaves have a typical shape, with 3 to 5 lobes. They wear small tufts of rusty hair on the veins when young.

Spread

The plant is usually propagated by wind-dispersed seeds. In forests, seedlings of A. rufinerve have been oberved at 50 meters from seed-producing trees. The species has also strong vegetative multiplication capacities. Stems root easily when they touch the ground and create new vertical shoots. Small fragments of stems can rapidly create new individuals. Root suckering have been observed. There is a high resprouting ability after cutting the main stem. It is an ornamental species which can escape from garden, parks and cultivation.

Habitat

In Belgium, A. rufinerve grows on poor and sandy soils. It tends to avoid the most dry and acidic soils (pH < 4.0). It clearly prefers oak over beech dominated stands. It is often found together with Prunus serotina, another invasive tree species.

Impact

Species classified B1 in Belgium.The species does not appear in lists of invasive plants in Europe. A. rufinerve is not widespread in Belgium, but there are several invaded sites where young stems form very dense thickets wherein few herbaceous plant species are able to grow. The species is difficult to manage because of its high vegetative muliplication capacity. For more information, click here

Recommendation

Avoid planting this species near forests (acidophilous beech or oak forests), especially in the vicinity of protected areas (natural reserves, Natura 2000 sites, etc.) ;

Possible native alternative

Main ornemental function

Ornamental tree

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